Common Nutritional Deficiencies/Eating Disorders

Eating Disorders

Also called: Anorexia nervosa, Binge eating, Bulimia

Eating disorders are serious behaviour problems. They include:

  • Anorexia nervosa, in which you become too thin, but you don’t eat enough because you think you are fat
  • Bulimia nervosa, involving periods of overeating followed by purging, sometimes through self-induced vomiting or using laxatives
  • Binge-eating, which is out-of-control eating

Women are more likely than men to have eating disorders. They usually start in the teenage years and often occur along with depression, anxiety disorders and substance abuse.

Eating disorders can cause heart and kidney problems and even death. Getting help early is important. Treatment involves monitoring, mental health therapy, nutritional counselling and sometimes medicines.

You are not at fault if you have an eating disorder. There are so many things in this world that affect your daily life and so many things you cannot control. Help is out there- whether it’s a confidential free 1-800 line, speaking with a doctor or therapist, or coming to RFH to ask what to do.

Indigestion

Also called: Dyspepsia, Upset stomach

Nearly everyone has had indigestion at one time. It’s a feeling of discomfort or a burning feeling in your upper abdomen. You may have heartburn or belch and feel bloated. You may also feel nauseated, or even throw up.

You might get indigestion from eating too much or too fast, eating high-fat foods or eating when you’re stressed. Smoking, drinking too much alcohol, using some medicines, being tired and having ongoing stress can also cause indigestion or make it worse. Sometimes the cause is a problem with the digestive tract, like an ulcer or GERD.

Avoiding foods and situations that seem to cause it may help. Because indigestion can be a sign of a more serious problem, see your health care provider if it lasts for more than two weeks or if you have severe pain or other symptoms.

Obesity

Obesity means having too much body fat. It is different from being overweight, which means weighing too much. The weight may come from muscle, bone, fat and/or body water. Both terms mean that a person’s weight is greater than what’s considered healthy for his or her height.

Obesity occurs over time when you eat more calories than you use. The balance between calories-in and calories-out differs for each person. Factors that might tip the balance include your genetic makeup, overeating, eating high-fat foods and not being physically active.

Being obese increases your risk of diabetes, heart disease, stroke, arthritis and some cancers. If you are obese, losing even 5 to 10 per cent of your weight can delay or prevent some of these diseases.

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